Working practices

Working Practices

I work with two types of commercially-available clay. One is a porcelain paper clay (actually made with flax rather than paper fibres). Since it can be worked wet or dry, it is particularly suitable for making more elaborate pieces composed of many different elements. The porcelain can take a lot of detail, and being white it shows off bright coloured glazes effectively. The disadvantage of the porcelain is that it tends to shrink and move quite a lot in the kiln. The other clay is T-Material, a more robust grogged clay which doesn't shrink or warp very much. I use the T-Material for single figures and small groups that don't need a lot of colour. I use around 50 different types of commercially available glazes to give a broad range of strong colours.

All my work is fired to 1230°C in a Rhode electric kiln, which gives consistent (if not entirely predictable) results.

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Daniel Currie